Youth Activism Evidence and Analysis Assessment Assignment | Cheap Essay Help

Using the formate/ structure identified on the attached Analysis Assessment Document I am required to write THREE body paragraphs to support my claim using the provided sources (attached Unit 9 document set),

Here is my claim (feel free to revise it as necessary)
“Methods young people can use to create change in their communities are spreading awareness through social media so more people will know about the issue, protesting to force the government to change the area, and creating fundraisers to get more people involved and to raise money.”.

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Youth Activism Evidence and Analysis Assessment Assignment | Cheap Essay Help
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

 

Honors Global Civics

Unit 9: Youth Activism

Evidence and Analysis Assessment

 

PROMPT: What methods can young people use to create change in their communities?

Directions: Using the Unit 9 document set, you will write THREE body paragraphs to support your claim (written last week,) with:

  • At least SIX pieces of specific and relevant evidence (2 pieces per paragraph) from at least FOUR of the provided documents. Your evidence should be well organized into paragraphs that support ALL parts of your claim, and properly cited. You should also include any relevant context or background information – apply what you’ve learned about these movements over the past three weeks!
  • Analysis of each piece of evidence that clearly explains HOW young people have created change in their communities.

*Use the outline on page two to guide your response; type your response directly into this document!*

 

SSWR2: Evidence

Performance Indicator: Provide accurate and relevant evidence that is effectively organized, contextualized, and directly supports the claim.

 

Emerging (1): I can identify some information related to my claim, however this information does not provide evidence that is accurate, relevant, contextualized, or supports my claim. Developing (2): I can provide accurate evidence related to my claim. My evidence may contain irrelevant content and/or may lack organization or contextualization. Achieving (3): I can provide accurate and relevant evidence that is effectively organized, contextualized, and directly supports my entire claim. Excelling (4): I can comprehensively provide ample, accurate, and relevant evidence that is effectively organized, contextualized, and  supports my entire claim.

Feedback for Revision (if necessary):

  • Evidence is too vague; need more specific examples
  • Evidence is not accurate
  • Evidence is not relevant to the prompt / claim
  • Insufficient evidence to support claim – need more!!
  • Evidence is not effectively organized or introduced
  • Evidence lacks citation

 

SSWR3: Analysis

Performance Indicator: Clearly and accurately explain how each piece of evidence supports the claim and how the evidence has relevance and/or significance.

 

Emerging (1): I attempt to rephrase my evidence but do not add accurate insight for how my evidence supports my claim or how the evidence has relevance and/or significance. Developing (2): I can rephrase my evidence, however I do not fully explain how my evidence supports my claim and/or how the evidence has relevance and/or significance. Achieving (3): I can clearly and accurately explain how each piece of evidence supports my claim and how the evidence has relevance and/or significance. Excelling (4): I can clearly, accurately, and thoroughly explain how each piece of evidence supports and enhances my claim and how the evidence has relevance and/or significance.

Feedback for Revision (if necessary):

  • Analysis does not effectively or accurately summarize evidence or ONLY summarizes evidence
  • Analysis is missing contextualization including author’s purpose, audience, background, or tone/word choice
  • Analysis does not explain how or why evidence supports claim
  • Other:

Outline

  1. Claim
  • Write your original or revised claim. You can include a sentence or two of context before your claim if you’d like!

 

  1. Body Paragraph 1
  • Topic sentence about the first reason in your claim
  • Introduction to evidence (Who wrote this? When was this written? What is the title?)
  • Evidence that demonstrates the first reason in your claim (cite the document within parenthesis.)
  • Analysis of your evidence. How does the quote you selected or image description demonstrate the methods youth have used to create change? Is there any other important historical context or important source information to consider?
  • Second piece of evidence that demonstrates the first reason in your claim (cite the document within parenthesis.)
  • Analysis of your evidence. How does the quote you selected or image description demonstrate the methods youth have used to create change? Is there any other important historical context or important source information to consider?

 

  1. Body Paragraph 2
  • Topic sentence about the second reason in your claim
  • Introduction to evidence (Who wrote this? When was this written? What is the title?)
  • Evidence that demonstrates the second reason in your claim (cite the document within parenthesis.)
  • Analysis of your evidence. How does the quote you selected or image description demonstrate the methods youth have used to create change? Is there any other important historical context or important source information to consider?
  • Second piece of evidence that demonstrates the second reason in your claim (cite the document within parenthesis.)
  • Analysis of your evidence. How does the quote you selected or image description demonstrate the methods youth have used to create change? Is there any other important historical context or important source information to consider?

 

  1. Body Paragraph 3
  • Topic sentence about the third reason in your claim
  • Introduction to evidence (Who wrote this? When was this written? What is the title?)
  • Evidence that demonstrates the third reason in your claim (cite the document within parenthesis.)
  • Analysis of your evidence. How does the quote you selected or image description demonstrate the methods youth have used to create change? Is there any other important historical context or important source information to consider?
  • Second piece of evidence that demonstrates the third reason in your claim (cite the document within parenthesis.)
  • Analysis of your evidence. How does the quote you selected or image description demonstrate the methods youth have used to create change? Is there any other important historical context or important source information to consider?

 

  1. Conclusion (optional – you can restate your claim, or write a 1 – 2 sentence call to action. Based on what you wrote, how can WE create change in our society? What lessons can we learn from these youths?)

 

Honors Global Civics

Unit 9: Youth Activism

 

PROMPT: What methods can young people use to create change in their communities?

 

Document 1: Image of a Tweet sent by 16 year old climate activist Greta Thunberg, March 13, 2020.

 

 

 

Document 2: Excerpt from a speech made by 16 year old climate activist Greta Thunberg at the United Nations’ Climate Action Summit in New York City, September 23, 2019. This summit included U.S. President Donald Trump, along with several other world leaders. The goal of the summit was to discuss measures that countries could take to prevent the average global temperature from rising by more than 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) above pre-industrial levels (when humans first started creating mass pollution.)

 

This is all wrong. I shouldn’t be up here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean. Yet you all come to us young people for hope. How dare you!

 

You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words. And yet I’m one of the lucky ones. People are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing. We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth. How dare you!

 

For more than 30 years, the science has been crystal clear. How dare you continue to look away and come here saying that you’re doing enough, when the politics and solutions needed are still nowhere in sight. […]

 

How dare you pretend that this can be solved with just ‘business as usual’ and some technical solutions? With today’s emissions levels, that remaining CO2 budget will be entirely gone within less than 8 1/2 years.

 

There will not be any solutions or plans presented in line with these figures here today, because these numbers are too uncomfortable. And you are still not mature enough to tell it like it is.

 

You are failing us. But the young people are starting to understand your betrayal. The eyes of all future generations are upon you. And if you choose to fail us, I say: We will never forgive you.

 

We will not let you get away with this. Right here, right now is where we draw the line. The world is waking up. And change is coming, whether you like it or not.

 

Document 3: “Student organizes 5K run/walk fundraiser to benefit her undocumented peers headed to college” article written by Laura Rodriguez and published in The Chicago Tribune, June 6, 2019.

 

Although Gabriela Castillo has always been aware that she is undocumented, she did not know how much it would affect her life until her junior year of high school when she realized that attending college could be impossible at the lack of financial aid, she said. But instead of giving up, she decided to organize a 5k walk/run race to raise funds for a scholarship for other students at Kelly High School who, like Castillo, are undocumented and heading to college.

 

“I realized that I could not apply for FAFSA (federal student aid) like other students,” said Castillo, 17. “I really began to think that there was a possibility that I could not continue with my higher education.” It was her teachers at Kelly High School who encouraged her not to give up, she added, and then decided to take advantage of her situation to empower herself and her classmates. “I no longer believe that my status defines me or my future because I am proving that I can do things that nobody expects from me,” she said.

 

Castillo’s goal is to raise at least $2,000 for a scholarship for two current seniors at Kelly who are attending college next fall. “Although $1,000 for each student is not a lot, I know how difficult it is (not having resources), and (the money) will help a bit,” she said.  The 3.1-mile race or walk, named Kelly Dash-Chasing Our Dreams, began as a project in one of her classes.

 

Castillo managed to organize the race with the help of Anna Lane, a history teacher at the Chicago public high school. Both Castillo and Lane said they don’t only share a passion for running, but also to advocate for the undocumented community. Ms. Lane, who has taught at  Kelly High School for 18 years, has worked to guide students like Castillo to seek and find the necessary resources to achieve their higher education. Ms. Lane connected Castillo to Ald. George Cárdenas (D-12), who after hearing Castillo’s story, donated the permit for the race at the park and said that he would provide water and some food for the participants, Castillo explained. The student has also received support from students, teachers, and the community. Several restaurants have pledged to donate some money or to promote the race.  There are approximately 70 registered participants, she said. “I don’t plan to stop here,” Castillo said. She promised to continue seeking donations to increase the amount of the scholarship. The candidates for the scholarship are all part of the Dreamers Club at the high school, a group of undocumented students at Kelly. The winners will be chosen by the Kelly Committee, a committee of teachers and staff of the school.

 

Castillo lives with her family in the Gage Park neighborhood. Her dream is to attend Northwestern University or the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to study psychology and become a therapist. “I know that when you have someone to guide you and influence you positively, you can flourish to your full potential,” she said.

 

Document 4: Tweet from United We Dream, the first & largest immigrant youth-led organization in the nation. This tweet was sent on June 21, 2019, when President Trump had announced impending ICE raids in communities across the U.S.

 

 

Document 5: “From Parkland to Sunrise: A Year of Extraordinary Youth Activism,” article written by Emily Witt, published in the New Yorker. February 13, 2019.

 

This Valentine’s Day marks a year since seventeen people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida. On February 14th, the Website and social-media feeds of the March for Our Lives, the youth-led gun-control movement that began in the aftermath of the shooting, will go dark. The founders of the movement will not give interviews or make any public comments.

 

“It’s about recognizing that we need to take time for ourselves because we’ve been going so strongly for the past year without a breather,” Jaclyn Corin, a senior at Stoneman Douglas and one of the co-founders of the movement, told me in a recent phone call. “We’re giving ourselves that time to be with our friends and our family.”

 

From the beginning, what made the March for Our Lives students seem different was the simple fact that they believed that the worsening epidemic of gun violence in this country could actually be fixed. Only days after the shooting, they directly lobbied representatives in the Florida state capital of Tallahassee and in Washington, D.C. On March 14, 2018, to commemorate a month since the event and to advocate for stricter gun laws, they led more than a million students to walk out of schools across the country. On March 24th, hundreds of thousands of people rallied outside the Capitol for the March for Our Lives, the largest youth protest in Washington since the Vietnam War. Another walkout followed, on April 20th, the nineteenth anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School, in Littleton, Colorado.

 

The protest phase of the movement mostly ended there, but the young activists continued their work. They organized two bus tours to encourage young people to vote, one in Florida and one that toured nationwide, and registered thousands of young voters over the summer. They held public meetings and formed alliances with other local youth gun-control activists—Good Kids Mad City and the Peace Warriors—and survivors of mass shootings in Santa Fe, Texas; Aurora, Colorado; and the Red Lake Indian Reservation, in Northern Minnesota, among many other places. They showed their commitment not only to ending mass shootings but to educating the public on the ways that guns increase the likelihood of fatality in acts of suicide, domestic violence, and gang strife. During a fall college tour, they continued their voter-registration push, partnering with Rock the Vote and the N.A.A.C.P.

 

Document 6: “The Youth Activists Behind the Standing Rock Resistance,” article written by Matthew Green, published in KQED, May 23, 2017.

 

At first glance, it’s easy to consider the dramatic effort to block construction of an oil pipeline near the Standing Rock reservation a defeat.

 

Just over a year since the protests began, the fiercely contested Dakota Access Pipeline is near completion. Long-stalled construction resumed in February, following an order by President Trump within his first days in office. And the once-vibrant, sprawling protest camps that dotted the North Dakota plains and came to symbolize an internationally recognized struggle for native rights and environmental justice have all but disappeared.

 

But for the small group of often overlooked native youth who started the movement, the experience was transformational. “This has changed my life completely,” said Jasilyn Charger, 20, of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, who first helped organize the protest. “I will never be the same girl I was when I first came to camp. … My people gave me courage. And I’m going to continue this fight.”

 

Calling themselves the One Mind Youth Movement, Jasilyn Charger’s small group set up a tiny “prayer camp” on the still-frozen ground last spring on the northernmost edge of the Standing Rock reservation. It was one of the first actions to block construction of the pipeline, a project slated to move half a million barrels of oil a day under the nearby Missouri River, which the tribe said threatened its main water supply and desecrated sacred ancestral lands. In August, the group also organized a nearly 2,000-mile relay-style run to Washington, D.C., to bring those concerns directly to federal officials and draw more national attention to the issue.

 

Within months, thousands of protesters from around the world joined the sprawling camp near the river, an improbable movement uniting conservative farmers, urban environmentalists and members of hundreds of American Indian tribes from around the country, in what became one of the largest native resistance efforts in U.S. history.

 

 

Document 7: Image of Black Lives Matter protesters in Chicago in response to the police shooting of Paul O’Neal, July 28, 2016.

 

 

Document 8: Tweet from IGrow Chicago, a community organization in Englewood, in reference to their #NoLifeIsExpendable campaign, which is raising money to provide support for families during the COVID-19 pandemic. April 30, 2020.

 

Place Order
Grab A 14% Discount on This Paper
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Try it now!

Grab A 14% Discount on This Paper

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.