WWI and Women Assignment | Get Paper Help

I need one body paragraph using Source 2 author Toler.

1 pages / 275 words

 

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
WWI and Women Assignment | Get Paper Help
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Student’s Name

Institution Affiliation

Course Title

Date of Submission

WWI and Women

Research Question: Did women face more opportunities or challenges during WWI?

Introduction Paragraph:

  • Basic background
    • Women initially had no choice but to work at home or on light duties that were not made for men for them to feed their families.
    • During World War 1, things seemed to take a different direction as women started being recruited in jobs that were vacated by men who left for war, thus giving women new roles.
  • key terminology
    • world war 1, gender norms, manpower
  • main ideas
    • During World War 1, women joined new jobs that were made for men’s gender due to increased workforce needs.
    • The women during the period of world war 1 owned valuable items that they had never had before the war
    • Despite the opportunities the women enjoyed, they suffered from gender norms
  • Thesis Statement: During World War 1, women faced more opportunities than challenges since they moved into the workforce, taking roles that were vacated by men as they left for the military, giving them new professional experiences.

Body Paragraph 1:

  • During World War 1, women joined new jobs that were made for men’s gender due to increased workforce needs.
    • Evidence/support #1:
      • The need for workforce increased, leading to more women signing up for sensitive positions. For instance, women took positions of ambulance drivers, members of service auxiliaries, and soldiers.
    • Evidence/support #2:
      • The majority of the women who were aged 18 to 35 years upon going to recruiting stations found themselves listed in the Yeoman, where the enlisted rate was high for women in the US Naval Reserves(Toler &Pamela , Para6).
    • ANALYSIS: The aspect of finding job opportunities in positions that were left vacant by men reveals that women could uplift their skills and experience, which would be essential after the war while they search for more significant positions in the workforce. As a result, the women faced opportunities to grow themselves rather than challenges that could break them.

Body Paragraphs 2:

  • The women during the period of world war 1 owned valuable items that they had never had before the war.
  • Evidence/support #1:
    • For the first time, the women were able to acquire items that were seen to be valuable—for instance,one of the items that the women-owned was a scrapbook.
  • Evidence/support #2:
    • According to Michelle et al. (Pg455), one of the women that possessed such valuable items was Alma Clarke. Michelle, in her work, provides us with a picture showing Clarke’s auxiliary uniform as she worked as a child welfare worker and red cross Auxiliary. From her scrapbook, one could understand her reactions to encounter death.
  • ANALYSIS: The case of Clarke reveal what women were capable of achieving with the current job opportunities that they had no chance to pursue initially.

Body Paragraph 3:

  • Despite the opportunities the women enjoyed, they suffered from gender norms
  • Evidence/support #1:
    • Some women were ignored because of their gender, and Lenah Higbee, being a chief nurse Higbee and having received the navy cross during World War 1 stood with them as a way of encouraging them(U.S. Navy – World War I Centennial, Para 2.
  • Evidence/support #2:
    • Lenah went ahead to care for thousands of people who had suffered from both the first world war and the Spanish flu epidemic depicting how women had to overcome significant challenges before achieving greatness.
  • ANALYSIS: Such an aspect of Lenah provides us with a picture of what women had to go through during World War 1, despite securing new job opportunities. An actual woman had to overcome challenges as some of the women were being ignored before they could raise to higher positions.

Conclusion:

The women in world war 1 got access to opportunities despite struggling with gender norms that did not favor women, and such an aspect gives us a picture of how women were able to take up roles that were used to be played by men.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work cited

 

Moravec, Michelle, et al. “The Great War through Women’s Eyes.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, vol. 84, no. 4, 2017, pp. 452–461. JSTOR,

www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/pennhistory.84.4.0452. Accessed 14 May 2020.

Toler, Pamela D. “Women’s History: The Women of the US Military in World War I.” Time, Time, 26 Feb. 2019,

https://time.com/5537784/wwi-us-military-women/

“Women of World War One Honored by U.S. Navy.” Women of World War One Honored by U.S. Navy – World War I Centennial,

www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/1198-women-of-world-war-one-honored-by-u-s-navy.html.

 

Annotated  Bibliography

& Note Taking Form

 

My Research Question:Did women face more opportunities or challenges during WWI?

 

Thesis: women gained more opportunities your thesis could say “During World War I, women faced more opportunities than challenges because they moved into the workforce, taking over jobs that were vacated by men leaving for the military giving them new professional experiences.”

 

 

Directions- How to Use this Document:

 

  1. Fill in your research question at the top of this document
  2. Keep track of the citations for all of your sources in the box labeled ‘Annotated Bibliography Citations’
  3. Take notes on each of your sources in the provided boxes below ‘My Notes’
  4. Complete notations/analysis of your sources under the section called ‘Annotated Bibliography’ and follow the format directions described.

 

 

Annotated Bibliography Citations

Source 1:

“Women of World War One Honored by U.S. Navy.” Women of World War One Honored by U.S. Navy – World War I Centennial, www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/1198-women-of-world-war-one-honored-by-u-s-navy.html.

 

Source 2:

Toler, Pamela D. “Women’s History: The Women of the US Military in World War I.” Time, Time, 26 Feb. 2019, time.com/5537784/wwi-us-military-women/.

 

 

Primary Source 1:

Moravec, Michelle, et al. “The Great War through Women’s Eyes.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, vol. 84, no. 4, 2017, pp. 452–461. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/pennhistory.84.4.0452. Accessed 14 May 2020.

 

 

My Notes

 

 

Source 1:

Source Notes:

Direct Quotes, Paraphrasing, Bulleted information

●       Discriminated from the male-dominated medical community

●       She ai med to expand healthcare for military dependents / formalized Navy nursing uniforms bearing  oak leaf and acorn over an anchor

●       Member of The Sacred Twenty,” the group of the first twenty women to join the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps in 1908.

●     earned Navy Cross on November 11, 1920, for “distinguished service in the line of her profession and unusual and conspicuous devotion to duty as superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps.

●     Dedication to her nurses and patients reflect the highest standards of naval service,” said Dr. Regina T. Akers, naval historian

●       Efforts in making the NNC   created one paper to say “the most needed woman was the war nurse,” and defined her as “a soldier, fighting pain, disease and death with weapons of science and skill.”

●       Higbee held the record for highest score for Naval Gunfire Support of any ship in the US Navy / featured in the Surface Warfare magazine.

 

 

Source 2:

Source Notes:

Direct Quotes, Paraphrasing, Bulleted information

●     Women signed up as ambulance drivers, telephone operators, munitions workers, members of various service auxiliaries and even as soldiers in Bolshevik Russia’s all-female units

●     In the United States, the Navy’s “yeomanettes” and the Army’s Hello Girls were the first American women to openly serve in or with the military

●     Hundreds of women between the ages of 18 and 35 headed to recruiting stations. By the time the United States entered World War I on April 6, 1917, 2000 women had enlisted as “Yeoman”.

●     Most female yeomen were assigned to clerical jobs, the list of jobs the Navy considered suitable for women grew as the war went on

●     Women also worked as radio and telegraph operators, supervisors for naval shipments, commissary stewards, fingerprint experts, draftsmen, pharmacists, torpedo assemblers and camouflage designers

●     Not allowed to serve at sea, female yeomen received the same pay as sailors and marines at the same rank, a uniform allowance, medical care and war risk insurance.

●     the number of female yeomen had increased to 11,000.

●       U.S. Department of War for one hundred uniformed female telephone operators who spoke fluent French. More than 7,600 trained women operators applied for the first hundred positions. Called “Hello Girls” by the soldiers, they made Army communications possible

 

Primary Source:

Source Notes:

Direct Quotes, Paraphrasing, Bulleted information

●       Helen McClelland (1887–1984) (see fig. 1) of the Pennsylvania Hospital Unit in Philadelphia

●        Beatrice MacDonald (1881–1969) of New York City’s Presbyterian Hospital Unit were among the first trained American nurses to arrive in France

●       Alma A. Clarke (1890–1963),  worked as a child welfare worker and then as a Red Cross Auxiliary nurse from January 1918 to June of 1919

●       They all created and left scrapbooks for us to study.

●       A page from Alma Clarke’s scrapbook showing her in her nursing auxiliary uniform

●       McClelland and MacDonald both received the Distinguished Service Cross, among other medals, in recognition of their bravery

●       When compiling her scrapbook of wartime memorabilia, MacDonald framed her history largely as a military account, while McClelland depicted herself only as a member of a medical team doing her duty

●       MacDonald saw all nurses’ service from a military standpoint. She pasted the Oath of Allegiance, a “muster roll” of nurses, and various military identity papers and orders in her album, alongside her many official letters of commendation.

●       McClelland, who later became the nursing dean at Pennsylvania Hospital, may have considered the scrapbook, which she assembled years later, as an official record rather than an account of individuals

●       Red Cross auxiliary nurse Alma Clarke’s scrapbook hints at her reactions to encountering death. scrapbook combines aspects of MacDonald’s military narrative with McClelland’s account of duty.

●       Clarke’s scrapbook depicts the auxiliary nurse as a sister-in-arms who supports the troops

●       Clarke framed her notes with a pictorial funeral consisting of a clipped advertisement featuring the poem “Flanders Fields” with the dead rising to heaven, a photograph of an AEF military grave, and a clipping of the lines of “Taps

●       How different women framed their wartime encounters with death.

 

 

 

Additional Notes/Source:

Source Notes:

Direct Quotes, Paraphrasing, Bulleted information

 

 

 

My Annotated Bibliography

 

Directions on Annotated Bibliography:

  1. Cite the source using MLA style.
  2. Describe the main ideas, arguments, and/or themes
  3. Explain why each source is useful for your research topic and how it relates to your topic.

Format of Annotated Bibliography:

  1. Each annotation should be one paragraph, between three to six sentences long (about 150- 200 words).
  2. Start with the same format as a regular Works Cited list.
  3. All lines should be double-spaced. Do not add an extra line between the citations.
  4. If your list of citations is especially long, you can organize it by topic.
  5. Try to be objective, and give explanations if you state any opinions.
  6. Use the third person (e.g., he, she, the author) instead of the first person (e.g., I, my, me)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Women of World War One Honored by U.S. Navy.” Women of World War One Honored by

U.S. Navy – World War I Centennial.

www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-

news/1198-women-of-world-war-one-honored-by-u-s-navy.html.

 

The authors Adam Bieniek and Kate Lyons, describe how women struggled with gender norms. Lenah Higbee stood up for women who were ignored because of their gender.  In fact, she was known as Chief Nurse Higbee and received the Navy Cross during World War 1. She was the first female to receive this award, showing that women do have power and can achieve great things just like men can. The two authors also examine Lenah Higbee’s actions and how they were recognized. They explain how she became the second Superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps in 1911.  Lenah then went on to care for more than a thousand people from both the First World War and the Spanish Flu Epidemic.  The authors then go on to explain that she was also a member of The Sacred Twenty.  This was a group of the first twenty women to take part in  the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps in 1908. Recognizing Lenah’s great achievements changed people’s views on women. This source is useful because it gives an example of an actual woman who had  to overcome the challenges of being a female in World War 1.

 

 

Toler, Pamela D. “Women’s History: The Women of the US Military in World War I.”

Time, Time, 26 Feb. 2019, time.com/5537784/wwi-us-military-women/.

 

 

The author Pamela D. Toler, looks closely into the specific jobs women had joined during World War 1.  The need for manpower increased, making women sign up as ambulance drivers, telephone operators, munitions workers, members of service auxiliaries, and soldiers. The author includes that many women between 18 and 35 years old went to recruiting stations, and during World War I on April 6, 1917, two thousand women had enlisted as Yeoman. The female Yeomen, an enlisted rate for women in the U.S. Naval Reserves, was often referred to as “Yeomanetees”. The role of the female Yeomen increased to 11,000.  Jobs for women grew as the war went on, showing that females became accepted throughout World War 1.   The author states that some of these jobs included, radio and telegraph operators, supervisors for naval shipments, commissary stewards, fingerprint experts, draftsmen, and pharmacists. This source is useful because it shows some of the opportunities that women have received. There were a variety of different jobs that allowed women to work and make an impact.

 

 

Moravec, Michelle, et al. “The Great War through Women’s Eyes.” Pennsylvania History: A

Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies, vol. 84, no. 4, 2017, pp. 452–461. JSTOR,

www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/pennhistory.84.4.0452. Accessed 14 May 2020.

 

 

The author, Michelle Moravec shows valuable items that had belonged to three women during the Great War.  One item that is shown, is a page from Alma Clarke’s scrapbook.  It is a picture showing her nursing auxiliary uniform. Alma A. Clarke, worked as a child welfare worker and a Red Cross Auxiliary nurse from January 1918 to June of 1919. Some of Alma’s scrapbook indicates her reactions to encountering death.  The other two women the author had mentioned are Helen McClelland (1887–1984) of the Pennsylvania Hospital Unit in Philadelphia and Beatrice MacDonald (1881–1969) of New York City’s Presbyterian Hospital Unit.  They also both created scrapbooks, in which the author shows pages of wartime memorabilia. McClelland and MacDonald both got the Distinguished Service Cross and other medals because of their bravery. McDonalds scrapbook of wartime framed her history as a military account and McClelland put herself only as a member of a medical team doing her duty.  This primary source is useful because it gives an insight on the three womens scrapbooks.  It shows what it was actually like being a woman during the Great War and working on the frontline.

 

Well done!

 

who is she?

 

Notes are to make sense to you and only you because they are your notes! as long as you are able to go back and provide context

correct format

detailed summary and explanation on usefulness of source — things to consider: is she an anomaly?

Place Order
Grab A 14% Discount on This Paper
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Try it now!

Grab A 14% Discount on This Paper

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.